Israel Says Hezbollah Can Hit Tel Aviv
Written by AP   
Thursday, 01 November 2007

Hezbollah Rockets During 2006 War
Hezbollah Rockets During 2006 War


UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Israel alleges that Hezbollah militants in Lebanon have rearmed with new long-range rockets capable of hitting Tel Aviv and tripled their arsenal of land-to-sea missiles since last summer's war, the United Nations secretary-general said in a report Wednesday.

Israel Says Hezbollah Can Hit Tel Aviv
By EDITH M. LEDERER – 11 hours ago

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Israel alleges that Hezbollah militants in Lebanon have rearmed with new long-range rockets capable of hitting Tel Aviv and tripled their arsenal of land-to-sea missiles since last summer's war, the United Nations secretary-general said in a report Wednesday.

Ban Ki-Moon said the reports of Hezbollah's rearming are a cause of great concern for the stability of Lebanon.

"Israel has stated that the nature and number of weapons in Hezbollah's control constitutes a strategic threat to its security and the safety of its citizens," he said.

Israel claims Hezbollah's long-range rocket force is stationed in areas north of the Litani River and that most of the new rockets, including hundreds of Zilzal and Fajr generation rockets, have a range of 155 miles, "enabling them to reach Tel Aviv and points further south," the report said.

"Israel also claims that Hezbollah has tripled its shore-to-sea C-802 missiles and have established an air defense unit armed with ground-to-air missiles," Ban said.

While Israel has not provided the United Nations with specific intelligence due to the sensitivity of the sources, Ban said several speeches by Hezbollah's leader Hassan Nasrallah in the past few months "seem to confirm these Israeli claims."

Senior Hezbollah officials have said Nasrallah's comments were made to serve as a deterrent to aggression rather than as threats to Israel, Ban said.

"Reports of rearming are a cause of great concern which pose serious challenges for the sovereignty, stability and independence of Lebanon," he added.

Ban said Israel's contention that Hezbollah has rearmed to a level higher than before last year's war — and that arms continue to be smuggled across the Lebanon-Syria border despite Syrian denials — raise serious concerns about implementation of the U.N. resolution that ended the 34-day war between Israel and Hezbollah.

Under the Security Council resolution, weapons transfers to the Iranian- and Syrian-backed militants are banned. Ban warned during a visit to Lebanon in March that arms smuggling threatened the Aug. 14, 2006 cease-fire. The resolution calls for the disarming of all militias.

Ban said there has been no progress the disarmament of Hezbollah and other militias, although he sees this as essential to fully restoring government authority throughout the country. The current political crisis in Lebanon has hindered efforts to implement the resolution.

Ban has said the Chebaa Farms, captured by Israel during the 1967 war, "remains a key issue" in implementing the 2006 resolution. The United Nations determined that the area is Syrian. But Lebanon claims Chebaa Farms — a claim backed by Syria — and Hezbollah continues to fight over the disputed land, arguing that Israel's occupation justifies its resistance.

The report for the first time publishes the provisional "definition" of the Chebaa Farms area, which was prepared by a senior U.N. cartographer.

Ban said he is encouraged by the Lebanese government's first strides to enhance the control of its borders. He again urged Syria to demarcate its border with Lebanon and establish formal diplomatic relations with its neighbor.

He criticized Israel for failing to provide Lebanon with "the exact location, quantity and type of cluster munitions utilized during last summer's conflict" which has led to an increasing number of deaths and injuries of Lebanese civilians.

"Israel's continued violations of Lebanese airspace not only constitute repeated violations of Security Council resolutions but also undermine the credibility of the U.N. ... and damage efforts to reduce tension, build confidence and stabilize the situation in southern Lebanon," Ban said.

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Israel alleges that Hezbollah militants in Lebanon have rearmed with new long-range rockets capable of hitting Tel Aviv and tripled their arsenal of land-to-sea missiles since last summer's war, the United Nations secretary-general said in a report Wednesday.

Ban Ki-Moon said the reports of Hezbollah's rearming are a cause of great concern for the stability of Lebanon.

"Israel has stated that the nature and number of weapons in Hezbollah's control constitutes a strategic threat to its security and the safety of its citizens," he said.

Israel claims Hezbollah's long-range rocket force is stationed in areas north of the Litani River and that most of the new rockets, including hundreds of Zilzal and Fajr generation rockets, have a range of 155 miles, "enabling them to reach Tel Aviv and points further south," the report said.

"Israel also claims that Hezbollah has tripled its shore-to-sea C-802 missiles and have established an air defense unit armed with ground-to-air missiles," Ban said.

While Israel has not provided the United Nations with specific intelligence due to the sensitivity of the sources, Ban said several speeches by Hezbollah's leader Hassan Nasrallah in the past few months "seem to confirm these Israeli claims."

Senior Hezbollah officials have said Nasrallah's comments were made to serve as a deterrent to aggression rather than as threats to Israel, Ban said.

"Reports of rearming are a cause of great concern which pose serious challenges for the sovereignty, stability and independence of Lebanon," he added.

Ban said Israel's contention that Hezbollah has rearmed to a level higher than before last year's war — and that arms continue to be smuggled across the Lebanon-Syria border despite Syrian denials — raise serious concerns about implementation of the U.N. resolution that ended the 34-day war between Israel and Hezbollah.

Under the Security Council resolution, weapons transfers to the Iranian- and Syrian-backed militants are banned. Ban warned during a visit to Lebanon in March that arms smuggling threatened the Aug. 14, 2006 cease-fire. The resolution calls for the disarming of all militias.

Ban said there has been no progress the disarmament of Hezbollah and other militias, although he sees this as essential to fully restoring government authority throughout the country. The current political crisis in Lebanon has hindered efforts to implement the resolution.

Ban has said the Chebaa Farms, captured by Israel during the 1967 war, "remains a key issue" in implementing the 2006 resolution. The United Nations determined that the area is Syrian. But Lebanon claims Chebaa Farms — a claim backed by Syria — and Hezbollah continues to fight over the disputed land, arguing that Israel's occupation justifies its resistance.

The report for the first time publishes the provisional "definition" of the Chebaa Farms area, which was prepared by a senior U.N. cartographer.

Ban said he is encouraged by the Lebanese government's first strides to enhance the control of its borders. He again urged Syria to demarcate its border with Lebanon and establish formal diplomatic relations with its neighbor.

He criticized Israel for failing to provide Lebanon with "the exact location, quantity and type of cluster munitions utilized during last summer's conflict" which has led to an increasing number of deaths and injuries of Lebanese civilians.

"Israel's continued violations of Lebanese airspace not only constitute repeated violations of Security Council resolutions but also undermine the credibility of the U.N. ... and damage efforts to reduce tension, build confidence and stabilize the situation in southern Lebanon," Ban said.

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An Inside Look at Hezbollah's Iranian and Syrian-Sponsored Arsenal

According to intelligence, Hezbollah's arms arsenal now numbers 20,000 rockets as a result of its rearming efforts since the war.  According to Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah that number is as high as 33,000 rockets.

Iran and Syria, two of the world's chief state sponsors of terrorism, are the main suppliers of Hezbollah's lethal rocket arsenal.   Over the course of the 2006 war, most of the rockets fired at Israel were manufactured in Syria, which supplied Hezbollah with the majority of its shorter-range rockets. 

Hezbollah's upgraded arsenal since the 2006 war currently includes:

Iranian-made Sayyad Misagh 2 and Shahab Tagheb surface-to-air anti-aircraft missiles.

Long-range Fatah-110 rockets, which have a 201 kilometer (125 mi.) range and can be equipped with a 227 kilogram (500 lb.) warhead. 

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which can be used for aerial surveillance or remotely piloted terrorist attacks.
A new air defense wing was formed in spring 2007. Selected Hezbollah militants are trained in Tehran to use air defense missiles in combat.

Rebuilt bunkers as deep as 70 feet, the width of a football field.  The underground bunkers are equipped with sophisticated communications equipment and connected by tunnels, which limit Israel's ability to destroy the bunkers by air.

Hezbollah is rebuilding its fortifications and new missile sites north of the Litani River.

At the commencement of the Israel-Hezbollah War on July 12, Hezbollah was estimated to possess an arsenal of 13,000 rockets.   Throughout the 34-day Iranian-sponsored war, approximately 3,970 of those rockets struck Israel at an average rate of 130 per day. 

On Aug. 13, the last day of military hostilities, Hezbollah launched 253 rockets, its severest attack during the war.

The short-range rockets in Hezbollah's arsenal, some of which can reach as far as Haifa and beyond, include:

122 mm Grad-type Katyusha, which carries a 30 kilogram (66 lb.) warhead and has a range of 30 kilometers (19mi.).

Improved 122 mm Grad Katyusha, which carries a 30 kg (66 lb.) warhead, with a range 50 km (31 mi.).

220 mm rockets, with a range of 70 km (43 mi.) These are similar to the Russian "Urugan" rocket.

July 16: In a Hezbollah attack, a 220 mm Syrian rocket directly struck the Haifa railway depot, killing 8 Israeli civilian workers.

July 23: In an attack on Haifa, a 220 mm Syrian-made rocket packed with ball bearings struck a road. The impact shattered a car windshield, killing the driver Shimon Gliklich, 60.

302-mm rockets, which carry a 175 kg (386 lb.) warhead, with a range of 100 km (62 mi.). These are similar to the Chinese WS-1 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS).

Aug. 4: In a Hezbollah attack, a 302 mm Syrian rocket landed in the environs of the Israeli city of Hadera, some 90 km south of the Lebanese border, the longest range rocket attack of the war.

Iran also supplied Hezbollah with hundreds of long-range rockets, which the Iran-backed terrorist organization fired at Israel during the war.

Hezbollah is known to possess both the long-range, Iranian-made Fajr and Zilzal missiles. Hezbollah's Iranian stockpile includes about 100 Fajr missiles and several dozen Zilzal missiles.

The Israel Air Force (IAF) succeeded in destroying the majority of Hezbollah's long-range Iranian rockets at the onset of hostilities.

The longer-range Iranian rockets provided to Hezbollah include:

240 mm Fajr-3, [pictured below] with a range of 43 km (27 mi.)

July 16: In an Iranian-designed and Syrian-produced Fajr-3 missile struck a train depot in Haifa, killing eight people.

320 mm Fajr-5, [pictured below] with a range of 75 km (47 mi.).

If fired from the Israel-Lebanon border, the Fajr-3 and Fajr-5 are capable of striking Haifa and cities further south.

600 mm Zilzal-2, which carries a half-ton (1000 lb.) warhead, has a range of 250 km (155 mi.).

If fired from the Israel-Lebanon border, a Zilzal-2 is capable of striking the entire Tel Aviv metropolitan area, where approximately 3 million Israelis lives, and cities much farther to the south.

Radar-guided C-802 anti-ship missile, an Iranian variant of the Chinese anti-ship cruise missile, carries a 165 kg (364 lbs.) warhead, with a maximum range of 120 km (75 mi.).

This missile struck the Israel Navy Ship, Hanit (The Spear), killing four Israeli sailors.

According to intelligence, other Iranian rockets such as the Shahin-1, Shahin-2, Oghab and the Nazeat, with ranges up to 50 miles, have been transferred to Hezbollah.

Antipersonnel Warheads : The rockets that the Iran-backed terrorist group Hezbollah fired throughout the war were outfitted with antipersonnel warheads, which contained hundreds of metal ball bearings designed to maximize civilian casualties and damage to civilian property.

 

 



Last Updated ( Thursday, 01 November 2007 )