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World Council for the Cedars Revolution

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Home arrow News Content arrow Blog arrow Blog Items arrow Intelligence arrow Missile-related shipment to Syria stopped, U.S. says
Missile-related shipment to Syria stopped, U.S. says PDF Print E-mail
Written by Times, Reuters   
Thursday, 29 May 2008

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Four countries last year prevented Syria from receiving equipment that could be used to test ballistic missile components, a senior U.S. official said on Wednesday.

Syria-bound missile components intercepted, claims US
Last Updated: 12:04AM BST 29/05/2008

Equipment bound for Syria which could be used to test ballistic missile components was intercepted during a previously undisclosed mission, the United States has announced.

Four member states of the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI), a group of 90 countries who seek to prevent the shipment of weapons of mass destruction, were involved in the operation in February, 2007.

US national security adviser Stephen Hadley described the incident in a speech to members of the PSI, which the Bush administration has sought to portray as a significant success in its drive to prevent biological, chemical or nuclear terrorism.

Analysts say it is hard to judge the PSI's effectiveness because members are reluctant to disclose successes to avoid betraying sources that provide intelligence needed to stop shipments.

"One example of its success occurred in February 2007, when four nations represented in this room worked together to interdict equipment bound for Syria - equipment that could have been used to test ballistic missile components," Mr Hadley said at a conference to mark PSI's fifth anniversary.

"Interdictions like this one have been successful all over the world - and have stopped many shipments of sensitive materials destined for Iran, North Korea, and Syria," he said, providing no further details.

In April, the US released photographs of what it said was a Syrian nuclear reactor built with North Korean help. Israel destroyed the reactor in an air strike on September 6, which was initially shrouded in secrecy for fear that its disclosure could prompt Syrian retaliation. Syria has denied the facility was a nuclear reactor.

John Rood, the US Acting Undersecretary of State, said on Tuesday that there had been dozens of PSI interdictions, including preventing the export of dual-use missile-related technologies as well as nuclear-related items to Iran. He gave no details.

Dual-use technologies are those with both civilian and military applications.

Mr Hadley argued that the countries in PSI - some of whom do not want their involvement publicised - need to explain their efforts and to prevent their citizens from becoming complacent about the threat of weapons of mass destruction.

"This is no time to fall under the spell of an apparent calm or the illusion of false security," he said.

In an effort to deter countries, militant groups or individuals from promoting chemical, biological or nuclear attacks, Mr Hadley repeated the long-standing US position that it reserved the right to use "overwhelming force" in response.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/2045825/Syria-bound-missile-components-intercepted,-claims-US.html

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Missile-related shipment to Syria stopped, U.S. says
Wed May 28, 2008 6:43pm EDT
By Arshad Mohammed

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Four countries last year prevented Syria from receiving equipment that could be used to test ballistic missile components, a senior U.S. official said on Wednesday.

U.S. national security adviser Stephen Hadley described the previously undisclosed incident in a speech to members of the Proliferation Security Initiative, a network of countries that seeks to stop illicit weapons of mass destruction shipments.

The Bush administration has portrayed the PSI effort, which was launched five years ago and has more than 90 nations as members, as a significant success in its drive to prevent biological, chemical or nuclear terrorism.

Analysts say it is hard to judge its effectiveness because members are reluctant to disclose successes to avoid betraying sources that provide intelligence needed to stop shipments.

"One example of its success occurred in February 2007, when four nations represented in this room worked together to interdict equipment bound for Syria -- equipment that could have been used to test ballistic missile components," Hadley said at a conference to mark PSI's fifth anniversary.

"Interdictions like this one have been successful all over the world -- and have stopped many shipments of sensitive materials destined for Iran, North Korea, and Syria," he said, providing no further details.

The United States in April released photographs of what it said was a Syrian nuclear reactor built with North Korean help. Israel destroyed the reactor in a September 6 air strike that was initially shrouded in secrecy out of what U.S. officials said was fear that its disclosure could prompt Syrian retaliation.

Syria has denied the facility was a nuclear reactor.

U.S. Acting Undersecretary of State John Rood on Tuesday said there had been dozens of PSI interdictions, including preventing the export of dual-use missile-related technologies as well as nuclear-related items to Iran. He gave no details.

Dual-use technologies are those with both civilian and military applications.

MEASURING SUCCESS

Hadley argued that the countries in PSI -- some of whom do not want their involvement publicized -- need to explain their efforts and to prevent their citizens from becoming complacent about the threat of weapons of mass destruction.

"This is no time to fall under the spell of an apparent calm or the illusion of false security," he said.

In an effort to deter countries, militant groups or individuals from promoting chemical, biological or nuclear attacks, Hadley repeated the long-standing U.S. position that it reserved the right to use "overwhelming force" in response.

Echoing a speech he made in February, he also said the United States would hold "fully accountable" those who support "terrorist groups" to acquire WMD "by facilitating, financing, or providing expertise or safe haven for such efforts."

Robert Einhorn, a former assistant secretary of state for nonproliferation who is now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank, praised PSI but stressed that countries had made such efforts for years.

"PSI was a good idea and it provides value added to what was done before," he said, saying holding exercises had created habits of cooperation and smoothed the way for joint action.

"How do we measure success here, especially where the partners are understandably reluctant to share information about successes or failures?" he said. "It's very hard."


© Thomson Reuters 2008

http://www.reuters.com/articlePrint?articleId=USN2844564120080528

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSN2844564120080528



 
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